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Keys to Persuading Thinker Personalities

Here comes your biggest challenge thus far;
trying to persuade one of the smartest people to ever walk the planet – Albert Einstein! Talk about intimidating;
he’ll see through every psychological ploy you toss at him. If you were going
to ask Einstein for something, how would you persuade him to say “Yes?”
In our final week we’ll consider how best to
persuade someone who is a thinker or analytical personality type. When I think
of this personality type, Einstein comes to mind because he would be someone
more task-oriented than relationship-focused. However, unlike Donald Trump, he
doesn’t seek to control situations and other people. Instead, he would be
someone more focused on self-control. The follow describes the
thinker/analytical personality type:
Very task driven; can be slow to act because they
like to think things through; exercise good self-control; don’t consider themselves
assertive; like data to support decisions; usually take a logical, systematic
approach to things; like to see track records and trends to support ideas.
Of the four personality types, the second most
often identified was the thinker at 29%. The one chosen most often was the
pragmatic (32%), then expressive (24%) and finally amiable (14%).
Because thinkers are task-focused like pragmatics,
it will come as no surprise to find out they chose answers that engaged
reciprocity and liking much less than did the amiable and expressive
personality types. Those personalities are much more relationship-oriented than
they are on prioritizing tasks. Some influence advice when dealing with a
thinker:
Using the liking principle is okay because it’s socially acceptable but you don’t
want to spend much time here because thinkers are not concerned with being your
friend. Don’t take offense but most of the time their thoughts are off
somewhere else.
Pulling the reciprocity lever – doing things in hopes of a return favor – won’t be
an effective strategy either. Thinkers will certainly accept whatever you give
them but it won’t be a high priority for them to find ways to repay the favor.
More than any other personality type, when it
comes to making business decisions, helping thinkers deal with uncertainty should
be your top priority.
Thinkers were more persuaded by the principle
of consensus – what others were
doing – than any other personality type. It’s not that they just go with the
flow; rather they can be persuaded by what others who are like them happen to
be doing. So tell Einstein what Tesla, Edison or other classic thinkers are
doing and he’ll listen.
Sharing facts or relying on the advice of
experts – the principle of authority – is more effective with this group than any
other personality type! One other expert is good but many (consensus) will be
your best bet when trying to persuade a thinker.
Consistency – what someone has
said or done in the past –was also high for thinkers. Only pragmatics had a
higher score. Pragmatics may believe they’re right in what they say and do
because of their egos. Thinkers believe they’re right because they’ve put so
much time and energy into their decision before they act on it or share it. Tie
your request to what a thinker has said, done or professes to believe and your
odds of success go up dramatically.
Scarcity was the least
effective principle with this personality type. Odds are they’ve thought about
your offer, perhaps researched it, so if it’s not actually rare or going away
they’ll see right through it. You’ll get much more response by helping them
overcome uncertainty (consensus and authority) in the business environment.
When it comes to the thinkers you know they
may not be as extreme as Albert Einstein. However, you’ll still be better off
focusing on certain principles because they’ll help you more than others. In
order, here are the most effective principles of influence for thinkers:
Authority
Consensus
Consistency
Liking
Reciprocity
Scarcity
I hope you’ve found this series on personality
types helpful. When it comes to persuading people, where you have a handle on
their personality type, planaccordingly and you’ll be far more successful than if
you simply wing it. Also, setting the stage – what you do before you attempt to
persuade – will be extremely helpful.

** To vote for Robert Cialdini, President of Influence At Work, for the Top Management Thinker of 2013 click here
Brian Ahearn, CMCT® 
Chief Influence Officer
influencePEOPLE 
Helping You Learn to Hear “Yes”.

Keys to Persuading Amiable Personalities

How would you like to meet Sandra Bullock? She always plays characters that are so nice
and now she’s going to be nice to you. Imagine for a moment you have a big
favor you want to ask her. How will you persuade her to say “Yes?”
This week we’ll take a look at how best to
persuade someone who is an amiable or facilitator personality type. When I
think of an amiable, Sandra Bullock jumps out at me because she seems to be someone
who is more relationship-focused than task-oriented. But unlike Oprah, she
doesn’t seek to control situations and others. Rather, she prefers to focus on
self-control. The follow describes this personality type:
Amiable people really enjoy relationships;
tend to focus more on feelings than facts; don’t consider themselves very
assertive; are usually willing to set aside work if someone needs to talk;
don’t like change; when they need help they prefer a real person to help them
even if it takes more time.
Of the four personality types, fewer people
taking my survey identified themselves as being amiable (14%) when compared to
the other personalities: pragmatic (32%), expressive (24%) and thinker (29%).
Because amiable personality types are relationship-oriented,
like the expressives, it will come as no surprise to find out they chose
answers that engaged reciprocity and liking far more than did the pragmatic and
analytical personality types, personalities that are much more task focused
than they are on relationship building. Some influence advice when dealing with
an amiable:
Make it a point to work the liking principle with these
folks, because they want to know and enjoy the people they interact with. Can’t
you just image Sandra wanting to get to know you and be your friend before you
get down to business? I sure can. The good new is, if she likes you then she’ll
probably go out of her way to help you.
While amiable personality types didn’t respond
to reciprocity as much as the
expressives they did place a higher value on it than thinkers and pragmatics. Do
them a good turn or something thoughtful and it’s highly likely they’ll look
for ways to return the favor.
Like the other personality types, when it
comes to business decisions, helping amiable people deal with uncertainty is
huge.
Amiable folks were persuaded by what
others were doing – the principle of consensus – a little more than
thinkers and expressives. When it comes to personal decisions consensus is even
more important. This makes sense for someone relationship focused because they
would rather go with the flow than buck the system.
Sharing facts or relying on the advice of
experts is the most effective route
with this group.  However, despite the
fact that authority was the #1 principle chosen
by amiables, it was not as effective as it was for thinkers and pragmatics.
When it came to using consistency – what someone has
said or done in the past – this was the #3 choice for amiables. With these
folks it’s not about being right as much as it is feeling obligated to live up
to their word. My guess is part of this has to do with being liked. If you can
tie your request to his or her beliefs or values the chance you’ll year “Yes”
will increase significantly. You’ll also learn more about them so you can connect
even better.
Scarcity was least effective with
this personality type when compared others. If something is truly rare or going
away, by all means incorporate that into your request but don’t spend much time
on it. You’ll get far more out building a relationship (liking and reciprocity) and helping them
overcome uncertainty (consensus and authority) in the business setting.
When it comes to the amiables in your life they
may not be as nice and personable as Sandra Bullock, but you’ll still be better
off focusing on certain principles that will help you more than others. In
order, here are the most effective principles of influence for amiables:
Authority
Consensus
Consistency
Liking
Reciprocity
Scarcity
Next week we’ll take a look at the final
personality type, the thinker, also known as the analytic.

** To vote for Robert Cialdini, President of Influence At Work, for the Top Management Thinker of 2013 click here
Brian Ahearn, CMCT® 
Chief Influence Officer
influencePEOPLE 
Helping You Learn to Hear “Yes”.

Keys to Persuading Expressive Personalities

You are one lucky person because you just got
another big break! This week you’re meeting Oprah Winfrey! You’ve been given 15 minutes to talk with
one of the few people who can make or break your career just my mentioning your
name. How will you influence Oprah to give you that positive mention or perhaps
airtime on one of her shows?

This week we’ll take a look at how best to
persuade someone who is an expressive or influencer personality. When I think of
an expressive, Oprah Winfrey immediately comes to mind because she’s someone
who is more relationship-focused than task-oriented. Like the Trump, Oprah also
likes to control situations and others. The follow describes this personality
type:
Expressives like being part of social groups; enjoy
attending events with lots of people; are more in tune with relating to people
than working on tasks; are imaginative and creative; can usually win others
over to their way of thinking; like things that are new and different; have no
problem expressing themselves.
If I had to sum up expressive personalities in
a word I’d say they’re balanced. Of the four personality types their answers
had the least amount of variance. In other words, all of the principles of
influence work well with them.
Because expressive personality types are relationship-oriented
it will come as no surprise to learn in my online survey that they chose
answers that engaged reciprocity and liking far more than did the pragmatic and
analytical personality types, two personalities that are task focused much more
than they are on building relationships. Some persuasion advice when dealing
with an expressive:
Definitely spend time engaging the liking principle with them, because they want to like the people they
interact with. Oprah certainly cares about closing the deal but she also cares
about you and your story so look for ways to connect with her. If she likes you
it’s a good bet she’ll go out of her way to help you.

Expressive personalities responded more to
reciprocity than any other personality type so look for ways to
genuinely help them and they’ll respond in kind much more than pragmatics or
thinkers will.
As was the case with pragmatics, in a business
setting overcoming uncertainty is key for expressives.
Sharing trends and what others are doing – the
principle of consensus – can be quite effective with expressives. Oprah types
want to move the masses and they know it’s easier to swim with a wave rather than
against it so share what many others are already doing.
Sharing hard data or using the advice of
perceived experts is the most effective
route with this group.  However, while authority was the #1 principle chosen by expressives, it wasn’t as
effective as it was with the other personalities. Show Oprah the numbers or
share insight from experts and it will give her pause to consider your request.
When it came to using consistency – what someone has said or done in the past – this was
the #3 choice for expressives. For this group it’s not as much about being
right as it is being true to themselves and what they believe. Look for ways to
tie your request to his or her beliefs or values and the chance you’ll year
“Yes” will increase significantly.
Scarcity was no more effective
for this group than the others. Definitely don’t force the issue unless
something is truly rare or diminishing. Oprah Winfrey and her expressive
friends don’t like to miss out on opportunities but just know you won’t be as
effective with the scarcity strategy as you might be with Donald Trump and his
pragmatic buddies.
When it comes to the expressives you know,
they may not be as expressive as Oprah Winfrey, but there are still principles
that will be more effective than others. As I noted at the beginning, there is
less variance with the principles for this group when compared to others. In
order, here are the most effective principles:
Authority
Consensus
Consistency
Liking
Reciprocity
Scarcity

Next week we’ll take a look at the amiable personality, sometimes known as the facilitator.

** Vote for Robert Cialdini, President of
Influence At Work, for the Top Management Thinker of 2013. Visit this site http://www.thinkers50.com/voteto cast
your vote.

Brian Ahearn, CMCT® 
Chief Influence Officer

influencePEOPLE 
Helping You Learn to Hear “Yes”.

Keys to Persuading Pragmatic Personalities

Here it is, your big break – you have a
meeting with the Donald! That’s right, Donald Trump has agreed to give you 15 minutes to pitch
your idea. How will you go about persuading him to get a yes answer?

This week we’ll take a look at how best to
persuade someone who is a pragmatic or driver personality. In my mind, Donald
Trump is an off-the-charts pragmatic because he’s someone who is more task-oriented
as opposed to relationship-focused and he likes to control situations and
others. The following describes this personality type:
Pragmatics generally want quick results; are more
focused on getting things done than chatting with people; prefer taking control
of situations; sometimes act before thoroughly thinking things through; are assertive;
not afraid to take risks; appreciate getting to the point quickly.
Because pragmatics are not relationship-oriented
it will come as no surprise to learn in my online survey they chose answers
that engaged reciprocity and liking far less than did the expressive and
amiable personality types, two personalities that are people-focused much more
than task-oriented. Some persuasion advice when dealing with a pragmatic:
Don’t be rude but don’t spin your wheels using
the liking principle because they don’t care much about being your friend. Do you
think Donald cares more about being your friend or possibly closing the deal? I bet he wants to close the deal.
Don’t try to pull the reciprocity lever by doing favors with an expectation that it will be
a difference maker because it probably won’t help too much. Donald will gladly
accept what you offer but it’s doubtful it will be top of mind for him to think
about how to repay the favor.
Uncertainty can be bothersome for pragmatics
so when they’re not sure what to do they tend to respond to a couple of
principles more than others.
Pragmatics generally don’t care what everyone
else is doing but it can be persuasive to tell them what others just like them
are doing. While they don’t respond to the principle of consensus as much as other personalities it was nonetheless one of
their top choices. Donald Trump doesn’t care what the run of the mill
businessperson is doing but he cares what respected peers are doing so do some research and incorporate your findings into your presentation.
Sharing hard data or using the advice of
perceived experts is the most effective route with this group.  In fact, in more than half the cases where authority was a choice, pragmatics went with it! Show Donald what
the numbers are or share what respected experts have to say and he’ll give that more weight than anything else.
Motivating pragmatics to action can be easy if
you know which principles to look for. Generally you want to use consistency or
scarcity.
When it came to using consistency – what someone has said or done in the past – pragmatics
were more motivated by this principle than any other personality style. In fact, it was
their second most often chosen reason when it came to being persuaded. When
Donald Trump says something do you think he believes he’s right? Of course he
does, so tie your request to his previous words, actions or beliefs and your
odds of success go up dramatically. I can back up that claim because I saw this to be the case on an
episode of The Apprentice.
While scarcity wasn’t one of the top three choices for pragmatics, using this
principle was more effective with pragmatics than any other personality type. Think
about Donald Trump – he hates to lose! Talk about what pragmatics might lose by
not going along with what you’re proposing and you’ll get more compliance than you would by talking about what they might gain or save.
When it comes to the pragmatics you know, they
may not be as extreme as Donald Trump, but nonetheless there are certain
principles that will be more effective than others. In order of effectiveness they
are:
Authority
Consistency
Consensus
Scarcity
Reciprocity
Liking
Next week we’ll take a look at the expressive
personality, sometimes known as the influencer.

Brian Ahearn, CMCT® 
Chief Influence Officer

influencePEOPLE 
Helping You Learn to Hear “Yes”.

DISCover Keys to Persuading Different Personality Types

Should you try to persuade different
personality types with different principles of influence? Several years ago I conducted
a survey on that topic and the results seemed to indicate there were certain principles
of influence that were more effective with particular personality types. 
My original survey contained a mixture of
business and personal questions, which led many people to contact me because
they felt they responded differently in business situations vs. personal
settings. For example, in business they felt friendship was far less important
when it came to saying “Yes” to someone than it might be away from the office.
Because much of what I write about is oriented
towards business I decided to conduct a new survey that would be entirely
focused on business-related issues. I’m happy to report that more than 500 people participated in the survey!

The actual survey questions can be seen here. Without going into great detail, what’s important for you to understand is each
question had three possible answers:

For the most part those who contacted me years
ago were correct – people seem to respond to different principles of influence
in the business environment than they do away from work. For example, with each
personality type those taking the survey responded most often to the principle
of authority. That’s not to say another principle such as liking was irrelevant
but it was clear from the data that given the choice to respond because of
friendship versus a perceived expert or hard data, people choose the expert or authoritative information when it came to saying “Yes.”

Something else to understand about the survey
are the four personality types I asked survey participants to choose from. The personality choices are similar to the DISC profile you may be familiar with:
Pragmatic/Driver – This is someone who is more
focused on accomplishing tasks than building relationships. They’re also more
focused on control of others and situations than they are self-control. Donald
Trump would be an off the charts representative of the driver personality
style.
Expressive/Influencer – This person is more
focused on building relationships versus accomplishing tasks. They’re also more
focused on control of others and situations than they are on self-control.
Oprah Winfrey would be a classic example of the influencer personality style.
Amiable/Facilitator – This is someone who is
more focused on building relationships than accomplishing tasks. They’re also
more focused on self-control as opposed to control of others or situations.
Based on the roles she plays, Sandra Bullock comes to mind for this amiable personality
style.
Thinker/Analytical – This individual is more
focused on accomplishing tasks that building relationships. They tend to
display more concern about self-control vs. control of others or situations.
Albert Einstein would be the perfect picture of this analytical personality
style.
In the coming weeks I’ll share details on
each of the four personality types and give some tips on the best ways to
persuade people when you have a handle on their personality.
Brian Ahearn, CMCT® 
Chief Influence Officer
influencePEOPLE 
Helping You Learn to Hear “Yes”.

New Survey on Decision Making

Several years ago I asked readers to participate in a survey to give some insight into what influences decisions based on personality type. The goal was twofold: to help people understand themselves better based on their personality type and more importantly, how best to influence others when you have a handle on their personality type.

The questions in that survey were a mix of business and personal scenarios. Many people felt they answered the questions differently depending on the setting presented – work or personal – so I’ve decided to do a new survey with a focus solely on business situations.
Would you like to participate in this new survey? It’s only 11 questions so it should take no more than two to three minutes so click here and take the survey. Look for a series of blog posts beginning sometime in June where I’ll share the results.

Thanks, I appreciate your willingness to help!
Brian

Brian Ahearn, CMCT® 
influencePEOPLE 
Helping You Learn to Hear “Yes”.

A Persuasion Trump Card

Are you a fan of Donald Trump’s show “The Apprentice?” When it first aired I watched it religiously because I learned some business tips but I don’t watch it so much anymore because there’s usually too much drama and too few tips. That said, I was watching an episode recently where Donald Trump’s new cologne, “Success by Trump,” was introduced. Each celebrity team’s challenge was to design an in-store display and come up with a slogan for the new fragrance which will be carried by Macy’s. The teams were judged by Trump and Macy’s executives on the creativity of their slogan, their brand messaging and the in-store display presentation they developed.

Aubrey O’Day, project manager for one team, suggested the tagline, “Trust your instinct.” Almost immediately Arsenio Hall found a Donald Trump quote online where The Donald asked, “Do you trust your instinct?”
At that very moment I knew Aubrey’s team would win the task. How did I know? I knew because I understand the principle of consistency and it is very apparent Donald Trump is a pragmatic when it comes to personality type. Allow me to explain how these two facts led to my immediate conclusion.
Let’s start with one of Robert Cialdini’s six principles of influence, the principle of consistency, sometimes known as “commitment and consistency.” This principle tells us people feel internal psychological pressure to remain consistent in word and deed. Most people feel bad when they say they’ll do something but then back out, even if their reason for backing out is completely legitimate. That’s why people go to great lengths to keep their word.
In addition to that aspect of consistency we need to remember people are more easily persuaded to do something when it aligns with what they’ve already said or done. In other words, tying your product or idea to what someone has already publicly stated will make the persuasion process much easier. I think you can see where I’m going with this.
Several years ago I did a survey with my blog readers on personality types and influence approaches. Using a basic four quadrant DISC model (pragmatic, expressive, amiable, analytic) I had people self-identify then take a short survey so I could find out if there were influence approaches that worked best with certain personalities. My data clearly showed there were, and when it came down to it, for the pragmatic consistency was one of the three principles that worked best.
Pragmatics are described using these terms: action-orientated, decisive, problem solver, direct, assertive, demanding, risk taker, forceful, competitive, independent, determined, thrive on challenges, strong intrinsic motivation to succeed, practical, focused, results oriented, direct and straight to the point. Doesn’t that sound like Donald Trump to you?
Let me ask you a couple of questions about persuading someone like Donald Trump:

1. Do you think he will be more persuaded by someone trying to buddy up to him using the liking principle or will he respond more to potential lost opportunities using scarcity? I vote scarcity every time. 

2. Do you think he will be more swayed by what everyone else is doing using consensus or more by the presentation of hard data using the authority principle? I’ll go with authority in this case.

As soon as Aubrey O’Day came up with the tagline and Arsenio Hall tied it to Trump’s own words it was a sure bet The Donald would love it. It was also a sure bet if he loved it the Macy’s executives would not try to change his mind. When both teams went to the board room I was proven correct.
So what does this mean for you? In your attempt to persuade others you’ll certainly be more successful when you understand the psychology of persuasion and how to ethically leverage it. However, using a shotgun approach with the principles is akin to mass marketing which will never be as effective as target marketing that considers the specifics of the audience. In the same way, knowing the type of person you’re trying to persuade allows you to look for legitimate opportunities to use principles that will be most effective for that personality type.
Sure Donald Trump likes to be liked and is somewhat interested in what others are doing, but if you rely on those to persuade him you’ll never be as effective as you could be by tapping into principles as I outlined in the questions above.
Here’s my advice: next time you go into an influence situation give thought to the personality type you’ll be dealing with then consider the best principles of influence to use. If you do so you’ll have a persuasion Trump card.

To find out more about how to do this click on each of the personality types below.

Brian, CMCT 
influencepeople 
Helping You Learn to Hear “Yes”.

Personality Types and Persuasion Approaches

In May I wrote an article on what I thought were the best ways to persuade people when you had a handle on their personality type. I came to find out there were no studies on influence approaches and personality types so I decided to conduct my own research in the form of an online survey in June.

In mid-July I published my findings in a series of articles. The information really resonated with readers and because the response was so overwhelming I decided to pull all the posts together so you could quickly find whatever information you wanted.

Influence Approaches for Different Personality Types – This was this initial article where I proposed what I thought would be the best influence approaches based on the personality type you were dealing with.

Personality Type and Decision Influencers – Invitation to Take the Survey – After realizing there was no research on this I constructed a survey and invited readers to share their opinions on what would persuade them to take action in different situations.

Survey Overview – Before presenting the details I gave people an overview of the survey, my intent, logic and some shortcomings I noticed.

The Thinker/Analytical Personality – This post looked at the logical, analytical personality type. Albert Einstein is a good person to picture when you picture this type of person.

The Facilitator/Amiable Personality – This article focused on the warm, friendly person. Sandra Bullock was who I thought of with this personality type.

The Expressive/Influencer Personality – This covered the outgoing, networking type of individual. Oprah Winfrey was who came to mind when I thought of people in this class.

The Driver/Pragmatic Personality – This last post explored the hard charging, decisive leader personality. Jack Welch, former CEO of GE, was a good person archetype for this category.

Survey Questions and Results – I ended the series by sharing the actual survey and detailed results for each question and each personality type.

I hope you find the information helpful as you interact with different types of people and attempt to persuade them. If you have questions just comment below and I’ll do my best to answer.

Brian, CMCT
influencepeople
Helping You Learn to Hear “Yes”.

Persuading Personality Types: Survey Questions and Results

From June 21, 2010 through June 30, 2010 I conducted a survey to try to determine the best influence approaches for different people based on personality type. In all, 265 people participated with the following breakdown by personality type: Driver/Pragmatic – 96 (36.2%)
Influencer/Expressive – 63 (23.8%)
Amiable/Facilitator – 58 (21.9%)
Thinker/Analytic – 48 (18.1%) Below are the 10 survey questions. After each question you’ll see the three possible answers. In parentheses is the principle of influence associated with the answer. Following each answer you’ll see the percentage of people in each personality category that chose that particular answer. The “Average” category is the overall percentage of all people that chose the answer regardless of personality type. 1. There’s a popular movie out, one you’ve been thinking about seeing. Which would be most likely to get you to go? a. A couple of good friends are going. (Liking)
Driver/Pragmatic – 59.4%
Influencer/Expressive – 68.3%
Amiable/Facilitator – 74.1%
Thinker/Analytic – 60.4%
Average – 64.9% b. Critics are giving it two thumbs up. (Authority)
Driver/Pragmatic – 17.7%
Influencer/Expressive – 14.3%
Amiable/Facilitator – 20.7%
Thinker/Analytic – 27.1%
Average – 19.2% c. It’s only in theaters till the end of the weekend. (Scarcity)
Driver/Pragmatic – 22.9%
Influencer/Expressive – 17.5%
Amiable/Facilitator – 5.2%
Thinker/Analytic – 12.5%
Average – 15.8% 2. Which would be most likely to get you to go out to dinner? a. The couple who invited you bought your dinner last time. (Reciprocity)
Driver/Pragmatic – 10.5%
Influencer/Expressive – 4.8%
Amiable/Facilitator – 10.3%
Thinker/Analytic – 12.5%
Average – 9.5% b. There will be a group of people which might make it more fun. (Consensus)
Driver/Pragmatic – 43.2%
Influencer/Expressive – 66.7%
Amiable/Facilitator – 41.4%
Thinker/Analytic – 33.3%
Average – 46.6% c. You’ve told your friends you want to spend more time with them so here’s your chance. (Consistency)
Driver/Pragmatic – 46.3%
Influencer/Expressive – 28.6%
Amiable/Facilitator – 48.3%
Thinker/Analytic – 54.2%
Average – 43.9% 3. You’ve been considering buying a new laptop, one that’s on the more expensive side. Which most influences your buying decision? a. A friend has the same laptop and loves it. (Liking)
Driver/Pragmatic – 13.5%
Influencer/Expressive – 33.3%
Amiable/Facilitator – 19.0%
Thinker/Analytic – 20.8%
Average – 20.8 b. It’s rated as excellent in all the online reviews you’ve seen. (Authority)
Driver/Pragmatic – 64.6%
Influencer/Expressive – 42.9%
Amiable/Facilitator – 62.1%
Thinker/Analytic – 56.3%
Average – 57.4% c. It’s on sale but only while supplies last. (Scarcity)
Driver/Pragmatic – 21.9%
Influencer/Expressive – 23.8%
Amiable/Facilitator – 19.0%
Thinker/Analytic – 22.9%
Average – 21.9% 4. Someone is trying to set you up on a date with a friend of theirs. Which is the biggest reason you decide to go? a. The person who is trying to set up the date is one of your closest friends. (Liking)
Driver/Pragmatic – 22.1%
Influencer/Expressive – 19.4%
Amiable/Facilitator – 19.0%
Thinker/Analytic – 12.5%
Average – 19.0% b. Several friends know the potential date and have good things to say. (Consensus)
Driver/Pragmatic – 31.6%
Influencer/Expressive – 46.8%
Amiable/Facilitator – 43.1%
Thinker/Analytic – 45.8%
Average – 40.3% c. A good friend reminded you this person has all the qualities you always say you’re looking for in a relationship. (Consistency)
Driver/Pragmatic – 46.3%
Influencer/Expressive – 33.9%
Amiable/Facilitator – 37.9%
Thinker/Analytic – 41.7%
Average – 40.7% 5. There’s a knock at the door and a little girl from the neighborhood is selling Girl Scout cookies. Despite promising yourself you were going to start watching your weight you order some because: a. You remember this girl’s parents bought things from your child in the past. (Reciprocity)
Driver/Pragmatic – 47.9%
Influencer/Expressive – 45.2%
Amiable/Facilitator – 55.2%
Thinker/Analytic – 38.3%
Average – 47.1% b. She tells you everyone in the neighborhood’s bought some so far and she only needs a few more sales to win a prize. (Consensus)
Driver/Pragmatic – 16.7%
Influencer/Expressive – 22.6%
Amiable/Facilitator – 24.1%
Thinker/Analytic – 19.1%
Average – 20.2% c. You didn’t buy last time the girl was selling things so you told her to come back another time. (Consistency)
Driver/Pragmatic – 35.4%
Influencer/Expressive – 32.3%
Amiable/Facilitator – 20.7%
Thinker/Analytic – 42.6%
Average – 32.7% 6. You’re married and your spouse asks you to do some light home repairs that might take several hours. You do them primarily because: a. Your spouse does lots around the house so it’s the least you can do. (Reciprocity)
Driver/Pragmatic – 69.8%
Influencer/Expressive – 77.8%
Amiable/Facilitator – 68.4%
Thinker/Analytic – 77.1%
Average – 72.7% b. Your spouse reminded you that other spouses generally do these kinds of things around the house to help out. (Consensus)
Driver/Pragmatic – 3.1%
Influencer/Expressive – 1.6%
Amiable/Facilitator – 3.5%
Thinker/Analytic – 0.0%
Average – 2.3% c. You’re going on vacation soon so either you get the repairs done now or spend money on a repairman. (Scarcity)
Driver/Pragmatic – 27.1%
Influencer/Expressive – 20.6%
Amiable/Facilitator – 28.1%
Thinker/Analytic – 22.9%
Average – 25.0% 7. You get invited to a wedding and it’s the same weekend you planned to start your family vacation. The couple mentioned the date when they set it but you forgot about it when you planned this vacation. You decide to go and the biggest reason is: a. The couple came to your wedding. (Reciprocity)
Driver/Pragmatic – 5.3%
Influencer/Expressive – 11.1%
Amiable/Facilitator – 1.7%
Thinker/Analytic – 0.0%
Average – 4.9% b. Several good friends from college will be there and they’re asking you to come and relive the good old days. (Consensus)
Driver/Pragmatic – 9.6%
Influencer/Expressive – 12.7%
Amiable/Facilitator – 5.2%
Thinker/Analytic – 6.3%
Average – 8.7% c. You’ve told them, “Absolutely we’ll be there” when they mentioned it shortly after setting the date. (Consistency)
Driver/Pragmatic – 85.1%
Influencer/Expressive – 76.2%
Amiable/Facilitator – 93.1%
Thinker/Analytic – 93.8%
Average – 86.3% 8. You’re trying to decide about whether or not to leave the company you’ve been at for more than 10 years for a new opportunity. Which plays into your decision most? a. A good friend works at the company you’re considering and it would be great to work with them. (Liking)
Driver/Pragmatic – 8.3%
Influencer/Expressive – 15.9%
Amiable/Facilitator – 10.5%
Thinker/Analytic – 10.4%
Average – 11.0% b. You read in several business magazines it’s one of the top companies to work for. (Authority)
Driver/Pragmatic – 54.2%
Influencer/Expressive – 42.9%
Amiable/Facilitator – 56.1%
Thinker/Analytic – 68.8%
Average – 54.5% c. You know they only hire a handful of people each year into this prestigious training program. (Scarcity)
Driver/Pragmatic – 37.5%
Influencer/Expressive – 41.3%
Amiable/Facilitator – 33.3%
Thinker/Analytic – 20.8%
Average – 35.5% 9. You decide to buy a new car. Which of the following plays into your decision the most? a. The salesman is an acquaintance who helped you out big time when he worked for a different company, one that did business with your company. (Reciprocity)
Driver/Pragmatic – 7.3%
Influencer/Expressive – 20.6%
Amiable/Facilitator – 5.2%
Thinker/Analytic – 10.4%
Average – 10.6% b. The car has the highest consumer reports rating. (Authority)
Driver/Pragmatic – 81.3%
Influencer/Expressive – 69.8%
Amiable/Facilitator – 81.0%
Thinker/Analytic – 72.9%
Average – 77.0% c. This is the last year for the body type you like. (Scarcity)
Driver/Pragmatic – 11.5%
Influencer/Expressive – 9.5%
Amiable/Facilitator – 13.8%
Thinker/Analytic – 16.7%
Average – 12.5% 10. Someone at work needs your help. You’re hesitant at first because you’re pressed for time before your vacation. You decide to work overtime and help mostly because: a. It’s a long-time friend. (Liking)
Driver/Pragmatic – 34.7%
Influencer/Expressive – 36.5%
Amiable/Facilitator – 50.0%
Thinker/Analytic – 16.7%
Average – 35.2% b. You were recommended by one of the senior managers because you’re one of the few people with the right technical background. (Authority)
Driver/Pragmatic – 27.4%
Influencer/Expressive – 33.3%
Amiable/Facilitator – 20.7%
Thinker/Analytic – 33.3%
Average – 28.4% c. The person mentioned how valuable your input was on a similar project a few months ago and you want to maintain that reputation. (Consistency)
Driver/Pragmatic – 37.9%
Influencer/Expressive – 30.2%
Amiable/Facilitator – 29.3%
Thinker/Analytic – 50.0%
Average – 37.4%Brianinfluencepeople
Helping You Learn to Hear “Yes”.

Persuading Personality Types: The Driver/Pragmatic

We’re on the final group in our look at the best ways to persuade people based on personality type. Our final group is the driver/pragmatic and as the name implies, people in this category are “driven.” They thrive on challenges and have a strong intrinsic motivation to succeed. They are practical, focused and results oriented. They have the ability to get lots accomplished quickly. Pragmatics talk faster than most people, can be very direct and usually get straight to the point. Words that describe people in this category include: action-orientated, decisive, problem solver, direct, assertive, demanding, risk taker, forceful, competitive, independent, determined and results-orientated.

With 96 people (36%) identifying themselves as being the driver/pragmatic personality type, they were far and away the largest group taking the survey which I think is only logical. Think about the kind of person that’s going to read a blog on influence and persuasion – probably a driven person who looks for opportunities for self-improvement. The second largest group was the influencer/expressive which should also come as no surprise. Leaders, people who need to persuade others, generally fall into the driver/pragmatic and influencer/expressive categories.

As I strongly suspected, the driver/pragmatic personality type is heavily influenced by the principles of scarcity, consistency and authority.ScarcityMy original hypothesis with drivers was that scarcity would play a big role in persuading them. My reasoning was simple – drivers are used to winning, that’s why they’re usually successful so show them what they stand to lose and you can probably move them to action. The survey results showed this to be the case as this group on the whole was more motivated by scarcity than all the other groups. It’s not that they were always motivated most by scarcity on each question but they were more consistently motivated by this particular principle of influence, choosing it as an answer about a quarter of the time.The survey question I found most interesting was question 1: There’s a popular movie out, one you’ve been thinking about seeing. Which would be most likely to get you to go? Because this was really a social situation it should not be a surprise that most people chose the answer that had to do with liking (A couple of good friends are going) but significantly more drivers, as compared to the other personality groups, said they would go when they learned, “It’s only in theaters till the end of the weekend.” In fact, the ratio of drivers choosing this answer was nearly double the analytics and more than four times the percentage of amiables!ConsistencyAnother thought I had about those in the driver/pragmatic group was this; their self-confidence makes them believe they’re right so it might seem like they stubbornly hold to an opinion. If you can tie your request to what they’ve said or done in the past (principle of consistency) your odds of success will go up. As Richard Dawson used to say on Family Feud, “Survey says…Yes!” The group that was most motivated by consistency was the analytic/thinker followed by the driver/pragmatic. A full 50% of the time, drivers chose an answer having to do with consistency when that was a possible choice. When an answer dealing with consistency was available, drivers chose it about 10% more often than amiables and 25% more often than people in the influencer/expressive category.I found question 4 most interesting for this group because it was social:Q – Someone is trying to set you up on a date with a friend of theirs. Which is the biggest reason you decide to go?
A – A good friend reminded you this person has all the qualities you always say you’re looking for in a relationship.Drivers responded to the consistency answer 46% of the time compared to 42% of the analytics, 37% of the amiables and just 32% of the influencers. AuthorityI was right on with my assumption about the principle of authority impacting the driver/pragmatic personality. My thought was this; they don’t care much what the crowd says because they tend to blaze their own trail and are willing to go it alone. However, cite a recognized expert or someone they respect and they’ll pay attention. When an answer dealing with authority was an option drivers responded to it just about half of the time and that figure would have been much higher but the percentage for question 1 about going to the movies had a very low response rate to the authority answer (critics are giving it two thumbs up).ConclusionWhat conclusion can we draw about people in the driver/pragmatic category when it comes to influencing them? I say with some pride, what I originally thought – tap into scarcity by telling them what they stand to lose if they don’t do what you’re asking. Bring to bear information from a person or source they recognize and respect to back up your assertion and if possible, incorporate their words or actions into what you’re asking. Bringing these three principles of influence to bear at one time could make if awfully hard for them to say “No” which means it’s much more likely for you to hear “Yes!”Survey WrapSo there you have it, my analysis of the personality/influence survey data. As I shared at the start of this project, I’m not a professional survey administrator nor am I a behavioral psychologist. Perhaps people in those fields will read this and take it several steps further. My goal was simple – to give you some easy to remember insights on a few ways to use the principles of influence in a more strategic way when you clearly know the type of person you’re dealing with. If you have thoughts on this subject I’d love to hear from you so just leave a comment below and I’ll respond as time permits.Brian
influencepeople
Helping You Learn to Hear “Yes”.